Author Topic: Planetary Classification  (Read 629 times)

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Planetary Classification
« on: October 14, 2016, 02:33:00 AM »
Planetary Classification

Class A:
A-Class planets are formally known as Class A Geothermal Planets. They are, as the name may indicate, rife with geothermal activity, which is the prime heat source for such planets. These planets are likely in their early stages of development, at anywhere up to two billion years old. Such planets may mature into other planetary types. As of the time of this publication, no forms of life have been found on planets of this class. Planets of this type are generally 1,000–10,000 Kilometers in diameter. The atmosphere of these planets usually consist of mostly hydrogen. Examples of this class include the planet Gothos, a rogue planet created by a member of the Q continuum in 2267.

Class B:
B-Class planets are formally known as Class B Geomorteus Planets. Such planets are usually very close to a parent star, and as such have very little geothermic activity of their own. Such planets can be up to ten billion years old. As of the time of this publication, no forms of life have been found on planets of this class. Planets of this class range from 1,000 to 10,000 Kilometers in diameter. The surface of these planets are high in temperature and have a somewhat molten surface. The atmosphere is chemically inactive. Examples of this class are best shown by the planet of Mercury, or Sol I, in the Sol system.

Class C:
C-Class planets are formally known as Class C Geoinactive Planets. Such planets have about no geothermal activity, generating no heat. Generally these planets are very far from their parent stars. Such planets usually are later in their stages of development, and range from 2 to 10 billion years old. As of the time of this publication, no forms of life have been found on planets of this class. Planets of this class range from 1,000 to 10,000 Kilometers in diameter. These planets are generally very cold, with partially frozen atmospheres. Examples of this class include the dwarf planet Pluto in the Sol system.

Class D:
D-Class planets are formally known as Class D Planetoids. Such planetoids are generally smaller than a moon or asteroid, and are usually locked in the gravitational pull of another celestial object, such as a larger planet. Such planets are usually made of metals, such as iron, nickel, or silicon. As of the time of this publication, no forms of life have been found on planets of this class. Sizes range from 100-1,000 Kilometers. Atmospheres of this class are generally either very weak or nonexistent. Examples of this class include Earth's moon, otherwise known as Sol IIIa.

Class E:
E-Class planets are formally known as Class E Geoplastic Planets. Such planets have significant geothermal activity. These planets can be up to 2 billion years old. Class E Planet's surfaces are molten. The atmosphere of such planets create hydrogen compounds and reactive gasses. Expected evolution of this type of planet is that it will cool into a Class F planet. Planets of this class include Excalbia, encountered by the Federation Starship Enterprise (NCC-1701) in 2269.

Class F:
F-Class planets are formally known as Class F Geometallic planets. Such planets have significant geothermal activity, and have volcanic eruptions across the surface. These planets typically range from 1-3 billion years old. Class F planets are typically 10,000 to 15,000 Kilometers in diameter. The atmosphere consists of hydrogen compounds and reactive gasses. The expected evolution of this form of planet is that they may cool to become Glass G planets. The only known life form on these forms of planet, at the time of this publication, are the silicon-based species known as the Horta. Planets of this class include the planet Janus VI.

Class G:
G-Class planets are formally called Class G Geocrystalline Planets. Planets of this class have been incorrectly classified as Class F in the past. The planets in this class are generally 3-4 billion years old. The surface of these types of planets are still crystallizing, and as such are not completely solid. Planets of this class are generally 10,000 to 15,000 Kilometers in diameter. Atmospheres of these types of planets are toxic to most life forms. The base part of the atmosphere is carbon dioxide, with several other toxic gasses in significant quantities. Lifeforms do exist in such climates, but only basic, single cell organisms have been discovered. Planets of this class may later evolve to become Class(es) K, L, M, N, O, or P planets. Examples of this class include the planet Delta Vega.

Class H:
H-Class planets are formally called Class F Desert Planets. Planets of this class are hot and arid with very little, or even no, water. Planets of this type are typically 4-10 billion years of age. Planets of this class are generally 8,000 to 15,000 Kilometers in diameter. The atmosphere of this type of planets may contain heavy gasses and metal vapors. Life forms have been discovered on this class of planets, namely radiation and drought resistant plants and animals. Planets of this class include Tau Sygna V.

Class I:
I-Class planets are formally called Class I Supergiant Planets. Planets of this class have a surface made up of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen compounds. Planets of this class are typically 2-10 billion years old. Planets of this class are typically 140,000 to 10 million Kilometers in diameter. The atmosphere of this class of planets vary in temperature, pressure, and composition. As of this publication, no life forms have been found to naturally exist on such planets.

Class J:
J-Class planets are formally called Class J Gas Giants. The surface of such planets are composed of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen compounds. Such planets are typically 2-10 billion years old. Planets of this class are typically 50,000 to 140,000 Kilometers in diameter. The atmosphere of these types of planets vary in temperature, pressure, and composition. Hydrocarbon-based life forms have been found to exist naturally in such planets. Examples of this class of planet include Jupiter, or Sol V, and Saturn, Sol VI.

Class K:
K-Class planets are formally called Class K Adaptable Planets. Such planets can be adapted for standard humanoid life. Such planets are typically 4-10 billion years old. The surface of such planets are barren, with little surface water. The atmosphere of such planets are thin, and consist mostly of carbon dioxide. Planets of this class are 5,000 to 10,000 Kilometers in diameter. Life forms consisting of single celled organisms have been discovered on such planets. Examples of planets of this class include Mars, Sol IV.

Class L:
L-Class planets are formally called Class L Marginal Planets. Such planets are capable of supporting humanoid colonization. Planets of this class are typically 4-10 billion years old, and are typically 10,000 to 15,000 Kilometers in diameter. The surface of these types of planets are rocky and barren, with very little surface water. The atmosphere consists of Oxygen/Argon mixes with high levels of carbon dioxide. Limited plant life is known to exist on these types of planets. Examples of these types of planets include Chin'Toka V and Regula II.

Class M:
M-Class planets are formally called Minshara Class Terrestrial Planets. These types of planets are the most stable type for humanoid habitation. Class M planets may feature large areas of water, however if water or ice covers more than 80% of surface then the planet is considered Class O or Class P. Such planets are typically 3-10 billion years old and have a typical diameter of 10,000 to 15,000 Kilometers. The surface of these planets are covered with land and water, but the water covers less than 80% of the surface. The atmosphere of M class planets is Nitrogen/Oxygen with trace elements in the atmosphere. Extensive vegetation, animal life, and humanoid life has been found to exist naturally on these planets. Examples of these types of planets include Bajor, Cardassia Prime, Chin'toka III, Earth, Risa, Romulus, Trill, and Vulcan.

Class N:
N-Class planets are formally called Class N Reducing Planets. These type of planets are are typically 3-10 billion years old. They are usually 10,000 to 15,000 Kilometers in diameter. These types of planets have extremely high surface temperatures, with atmospheres that are extremely dense with carbon dioxide and sulfides present. No life forms have been found as of this publication to naturally occur on such planets. Examples of planets of this class include Venus, or Sol III.

Class O:
O-Class planets are formally called Class O Pelagic Planets. These types of planets are those with surface water covering more than 80% of the planet. These planets may have some surface land (up to 19%), but it is not a majority feature. In all other regards, Class O planets are identical to Class M planets. Earth is just shy of the 80% mark to be considered Class O. Such planets are typically 3-10 billion years old and have a typical diameter of 10,000 to 15,000 Kilometers. The atmosphere of O class planets is Nitrogen/Oxygen with trace elements in the atmosphere. Significant aquatic based life has been discovered to naturally exist on such planets. Examples of this class include the planet Argo.

Class P:
P-Class planets are formally called Class P Glacial Planets. A Class P planet is a planet that is covered by at least 80% water ice and is capable of supporting native humanoid life. Like Class O planets, Class P planets are identical to Class M planets apart from their surface composition. Such planets are typically 3-10 billion years old and have a typical diameter of 10,000 to 15,000 Kilometers. The atmosphere of P class planets is Nitrogen/Oxygen with trace elements in the atmosphere. Life forms such as hardy vegetation, animal life, and humanoids are known to exist on these type of planets. Planets of this class include PSI 2000.

Class Q:
Q-Class planets are few and far between. The Class Q, from the old Vulcan Quaris class, was a type of planet that has rarely been encountered by the Federation. Conditions vary widely on class Q worlds, with very hot and cold regions and great variety in surface conditions. The Genesis Planet was an example of this class. Planets of this class are usually 2-10 billion years old and about 4,000 to 15,000 Kilometers in diameter. The surface of these types of planets varies, and ranges from molten to water and/or carbon dioxide ice, due to eccentric orbit or variable output of star. Atmospheres also range significantly. No life forms have been discovered to naturally exist on naturally made planets of this class as of this publication.

Class R:
R-Class planets are formally called Class R Rogue Planets. A Class R planet is a planet that drifts through interstellar space or in cometary halos and is not trapped in a star's gravity well. Planets of this class are usually 2-10 billion years old and about 4,000 to 15,000 Kilometers in diameter. The atmosphere of these planets consist of primarily volcanic outgassing. The surface conditions of these types of planets may be temperate due to geothermal activity. Some types of non-protosynthetic plant life have been known to exist naturally.

Class S:
S-Class planets are formally called Class S Ultragiant planets. A Class S planet is a planet the has a very tenuous surface. Planets of this age are typically 2-10 billions years old. Typically, such planets have a diameter of 10-50 million Kilometers. The surface is typically comprised of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen compounds. The atmosphere's zones vary in temperature, pressure, and composition. As of the time of this publication, no forms of life have been found on planets of this class.

Class T:
T-Class planets are formally called Class T Ultragiant planets. A class T planet is a type of planet, an ultragiant the has a very tenuous surface. Planets of this age are typically 2-10 billions years old. Typically, such planets have a diameter of 10-50 million Kilometers. The surface is typically comprised of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen compounds. The atmosphere's zones vary in temperature, pressure, and composition. As of the time of this publication, no forms of life have been found on planets of this class.

Class Y:
Y-Class planets are formally called a Class Y Demon planet. A Class Y planet is a planet that has a turbulent atmosphere, saturated with toxic chemicals and thermionic radiation. Such planets are typically 2-10 billion years old. The planet is 10,000 to 15,000 Kilometers in diameter. Surface temperatures are, at their lowest, exceeding 500 degrees Kelvin. The atmosphere of such planets are saturated with toxic chemicals and thermionic radiation.

Stars
A star (or "sun") is a massive energy-producing sphere of plasma and gas located in space. The region around a star that is held by its gravity, including any planets, moons, comets, and asteroids, is called a star system.

Stars are born out of huge gaseous nebulae. Inside these nebulae, centers of higher density form, slowly accumulating more mass as the center's gravity increases, to form a protostar. Pressure in the interior of the protostar rises, in turn increasing the density and temperature until the gas turns to plasma, where the atomic nuclei and the electrons are dissociated from each other. At a sufficient temperature and pressure, nuclear fusion is initiated at the core, producing light: the star is born.

Protostar:
A protostar was a star in the earliest stage of development, when interstellar gas was still undergoing gravitational collapse and nuclear fusion at the core has just begun. Collapsing protostars sometimes emit E-band bursts. Protostars are often marked by high levels of magnetoscopic interference, which impair sensor function.

G Type Star:
A G-class (or G-type) star is a stellar classification for stars composed of both neutral and ionized atoms of metallic substances, including ionized calcium, emitting in the neighborhood of 5,000 to 6,000 Kelvin, generally referred to as being yellow in color. G-type stars in the main sequence tend to be median in terms of absolute magnitude, and in the "cooler" half of the stellar classification system. Yellow G-type stars can range in size from yellow giants to the more diminutive yellow dwarf.

Hypergiant:
The rare hypergiant star is one which shares similar characteristics with a supergiant star, but is a hundred times more massive than Sol. The theoretical lifespan of a hypergiant is one to two million years. Supposedly, like its supergiant companions, a hypergiant star will go supernova when it exhausts its supply of fuel and gravity crushes the inert remains.

Neutron Star:
A neutron star is a very small, dense star composed largely of neutrons and Neutronium, formed from the gravitational collapse of a star's core left from a supernova. Some neutron stars, called pulsars, emit beams of electromagnetic radiation from their poles.

Pulsar Star:
A pulsar is a rapidly rotating neutron star that sends out streams of electrons at nearly the speed of light along their magnetic poles. These subatomic particles emit electromagnetic radiation, including radio waves, visible light, X-rays, and gamma rays, such as that as the pulsar rotates they appear to "pulse" with light to an observer.

Red Dwarf:
A red dwarf is a small, cool, very faint, main sequence star with a surface temperature under about 4,000 K. Red dwarves are the most common type of star.

Red Giant:
A red giant was a very large, relatively cool star, formed when a main sequence star ran out of hydrogen and began fusing helium. Some red giants were considered B class stars.

T-Tauri:
A T-Tauri type star was one in the earliest phase of its lifespan. The type was named for the first discovered star of this type, seen from Earth as part of the Taurus constellation. Small, extremely unstable wormholes are a phenomenon sometimes encountered in T-Tauri systems – in the century between 2267 and 2367, thirty-nine had been mapped.

White Dwarf:
A white dwarf is a star formed when a red giant runs out of helium fuel after losing most of its mass into space. These types of stars are the only known natural source of verderon particles.

Nebula:
A nebula is an interstellar cloud of matter, usually gases (such as hydrogen) and dust. Many nebulae are stellar nurseries. Since sensors and other systems functioned poorly in some nebulae, they were often used by starships to strategic advantage in conflicts. The matter within the nebula is disruptive to the sensor arrays of Federation starships. Some nebula have a subspace vacuole near the center of the nebula, acting as a gravitational anchor for the surrounding gas. In most forms of nebula, shields are impaired if not fully disabled. Engine speed is reduced when inside nebula to prevent the clogging of the impulse intake manifolds.

Black Hole:
A black hole is an incredibly dense remnant of a star that has collapsed into a singularity under its own gravity upon running out of fuel. Black holes have extremely strong gravitational fields, similar to cosmic string fragments, so powerful that not even light can escape. There are over 2,000 known black holes in the Alpha and Beta quadrants.

Wormhole:
A wormhole is a "tunnel" connecting two separate points in space-time. It consists of two apertures in space-time connected by a conduit outside normal space, through subspace. Since this conduit is shorter than the distance between the two points in normal space, it allows rapid travel between the two points. If a wormhole was large and stable enough, a starship (or other traveler) could travel through it. A wormhole could also connect two different points in time as well. As wormholes collapse, they become smaller and are known as micro-wormholes. No known naturally-occurring stable wormholes had yet been discovered in the Alpha or Beta Quadrants. The only likely candidate, the Barzan wormhole, was found to be unstable at its far terminus. However, several relatively stable wormhole-like phenomena have been reported in the Delta Quadrant.

The only currently known stable artificial wormhole was the Bajoran wormhole, created by beings known to the Bajorans as the Prophets, who dwelled within. This wormhole was stable enough for long-term, two-way space travel between the Bajor system in the Alpha Quadrant and the Idran system in the Gamma Quadrant.

Gravimetric Distortion:
A gravimetric distortion was a localized spatial anomaly that consisted of an abnormal concentration of graviton particles. Normally, gravitons concentrated around objects with definite mass, such as a planet or star. However, certain energy phenomena could emit gravitons without an attendant mass. Such a concentration could cause unique gravitational effects that greatly impaired starship navigation.

Particle Fountain:
A particle fountain is a small but dangerous spatial anomaly. In the Alpha Quadrant, the Federation has lost over a dozen starships attempting to study one. Consequently, the phenomenon is poorly-understood. The study of such an anomaly is a Priority-One research objective according to the Federation Science Council.

Spatial/Temporal rift:
A spatial rift is a physical opening in the spacetime continuum, which allows for passage from one point to another.
A temporal rift is a distortion in the spacetime continuum, which can allow for temporal displacement through space and time.

Dyson Sphere:
A Dyson sphere was a colossal spherical structure constructed around a star, completely surrounding it. The interior of the sphere would absorb the entire energy output of that star, allowing for lifeforms to live on the interior surface almost indefinitely. Such a structure was theorized by 20th century physicist Freeman Dyson in the late 1960s.
For the interior of a Dyson sphere to be habitable to most humanoid lifeforms, the radius of the sphere must be such that habitable temperatures (5 – 30 °C) are maintained. The radius would therefore depend on the size and the energy output of the star around which the sphere would be constructed; if a Dyson sphere were to be constructed around the Earth's sun, the radius would have to be approximately one astronomical unit. At such a radius, the interior surface area would be about 2.8 ×1017 km2 (1.1 ×1017 mi2), or 550 million times the entire surface area of the planet Earth. Such a surface area could easily support the lives of many quadrillions (1 ×1015) of beings.

Unsurprisingly, due to the almost immeasurable amounts of effort, resources and time required to construct such an immense structure, only one Dyson sphere has ever been discovered. This particular sphere encased a G-type star and had a diameter of 200 million kilometers, giving it an internal surface area of approximately 250 million M-class planets. As no radiant sunlight or solar wind escaped from the sphere, starships were not able to detect it until they were almost on top of it.

Asteroid:
Asteroids are minor planets. The larger ones have also been called planetoids. These terms have historically been applied to any astronomical object orbiting a star that did not show the disc of a planet and was not observed to have the characteristics of an active comet.

Comet:
A comet is a celestial body, usually orbiting a star, composed of rock and ice. If a comet approaches close enough to a star, the increased heat causes it shed mass away from the star, creating a coma and/or "tail".

 

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